Lemons can be used in anything from cakes to making water taste better, but at the store there is no need to spend your hard-earned money. As someone who has a lemon tree at home, I can honestly say that growing lemons is so easy – no matter how much or how little space you have.

You can start enjoying fresh lemons for FREE with only a small investment. Here’s what to start with:

  • One lemon
  • Potting soil
  • A container
  • A sunny space
  • Plastic film (breathable)

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Step #1: In the bottom of your container, drill small holes to allow water to drain properly.

Step #2: Place your potting soil in a bucket and add some water to make it fairly damp. Pour the mix into your container when ready, leaving under the rim about one inch of space.

Step #3: To remove a seed, take your lemon and cut it in half. Put the seed in your mouth, while keeping the seed moist, to clean the flesh. Just don’t bite down accidentally–lemon seeds taste awful!

Step #4: Take your lemon seed clean and moist and bury it in the soil about 1/2 inch deep.

Step #5: Use a bottle of squirt to add more moisture to the top–just make sure it isn’t too wet.

Step #6: Next, take the plastic and use it to cover the container top.

Step #7: Move the pot to an indirect sunlight warm area. Just not yet putting the plant in direct sunlight.

Step #8: You should see small sprouts starting to pass through the soil in about 1 to 2 weeks. Now is the the time to remove the plastic cover and move the plant to a warm area with more sunlight.

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Care instructions:

Young lemon trees need constant humidity, so make sure your plant is watered regularly.

You shouldn’t have to worry too much about about flooding the plant because you drilled holes at the bottom of the container, but still, be careful about water. With around 8 hours of direct sunlight a day, lemon trees will thrive.

If necessary, add fertilizer approximately every six months to a year.

As your plant grows, take note of whether its original container appears to be getting too small. You can transplant it carefully into a larger pot or into the ground directly.

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Don’t expect an immediate flurry of lemons. In most cases, producing a good number of lemons takes up to three years for a lemon tree.

But rest assured that your patience will pay off–once your tree begins to sprout lemons, you’ll have enough to meet all your your needs, as well as extras to spoil your friends, family and neighbours.

Indeed, from its first crop, a 3-year-old lemon tree can produce up to 38 pounds of fruit. It’s only getting better from there. In a single year, lemon trees that are 4 or 5 years old can produce about 100 pounds of lemons.

You can expect to get as much as 200 pounds of lemons a year after the tree is fully matured.

At that point, as a side hustle, you could open a lemonade stand as well.

Lemon trees can grow quite high in the right environment, reaching about 20 feet at a surprisingly fast clip.

I love the lemon trees that give off the sweet citrus scent, often before lemons appear.

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With so many delicious lemons at your disposal, you will be happy to know that this sweet and sour fruit has many health benefits.

Lemon benefits include:

  • Low in calories (only 24 calories a pop) and high in fiber
  • Lemon contains potassium, milligrams of iron, and vitamin B6
  • Furthermore, they offer a solid amount of folate, magnesium, calcium, copper, pantothenic acid, and thiamine.
  • The body needs the pantothenic acids and folates found in lemons, but they can’t be produced inside the body.
  • Lemons are rich in citric acid, which helps in digestion and can help dissolve the stones of the kidney
  • The ascorbic acid found in lemons is a natural antioxidant that helps to combat inflammation.
  • Shown to reduce osteoarthritis-related pain and rheumatoid arthritis
  • Naturally help prevent free radical damage

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Plus there are many ways to use your lemons.

Add them to your water or your favorite cocktails for a little more fun.

To add zest to many foods, use the rinds–from chicken to pasta.

I know some people who like to eat them plain!